About The Bahamas

About The Bahamas


Lying 60 miles off the coast of Florida and running more than 500 miles in a southeasterly direction nearly to the tip of Cuba, the 700 islands and more than 2,000 smaller cays and rocks that make up The Bahamas are among the most sought after pieces of real estate in the world. That’s partially of the scarcity of land in a nation that has emerged as a highly desirable place to live, vacation and invest.

With year-round warmth, financial and political stability, proximity to the United States, sophisticated international airports, a tax-friendly environment and a warm and hospitable people, The Bahamas is an English-speaking sovereign nation which gained independence from the United Kingdom in 1973. That British heritage and its geographical closeness to America have combined to create an interesting cultural mix, high tech and high formality hand-in-hand. The capital is Nassau located on the island of New Providence. The second largest city is Freeport on the island of Grand Bahama. The third, but perhaps the fastest growing and most intriguing for many searching for second homes with rental potential, is Abaco, a collection of islands and cays in the northwest Bahamas known as the yachting capital of The Bahamas. In 2014, more than six million tourists are expected to visit The Bahamas, making tourism once again the country’s number one industry followed by financial services. Real estate and agriculture and fisheries compete for third place.

Although saleable resources are limited, the country’s most impressive natural resource are the waters that make up 90% of its mass. Largely shallow, but with deep blue holes and the world’s third largest barrier reef, the sparkling turquoise and aqua waters of The Bahamas are so clear that it is said you can tell heads and tails on a coin dropped several feet below the surface. Coral reefs, threatened around the world, are feeling the toll of constant usage and boating traffic but there are still hundreds teaming with colourful parrot and angelfish, tall heads of brain coral, purple sea fans, starfish and blades of grass swaying gently under the sea.

The government maintains a thorough website, Bahamas.gov.bs, which includes laws, regulations, policies and current news along with important phone numbers and dates.